How to Safely Build Body Strength and Stamina for Maximum Muscle Gains Naturally

The basic principles of weight training are essentially identical to those of strength training, and involve a manipulation of the number of repetitions (reps), sets, tempo, exercise types, and weight moved to cause desired increases in strength, endurance, and size. The specific combinations of reps, sets, exercises, and weights depends on the aims of the individual performing the exercise. Sets with fewer reps can be performed with heavier weights contributing to an increase in lean muscle mass and sets with higher reps can be performed with lighter weights contributing to increased muscular endurance.

In addition to the basic principles of strength training, a further consideration added by weight training is the equipment used. Types of equipment include barbells, dumbbells, pulleys and stacks in the form of weight machines, and the body’s own weight in the case of chin-ups and push-ups. Different types of weights will give different types of resistance, and often the same absolute weight can have different relative weights depending on the type of equipment used. For example, lifting 10 kilograms using a dumbbell sometimes requires more force than moving 10 kilograms on a weight stack if certain pulley arrangements are used. In other cases, the weight stack may require more force than the equivalent dumbbell weight due to additional torque or resistance in the machine. Additionally, although they may display the same weight stack, different machines may be heavier or lighter depending on the number of pulleys and their arrangements.

Weight training also requires the use of ‘good form’, performing the movements with the appropriate muscle group, and not transferring the weight to different body parts in order to move greater weight (called ‘cheating’). Failure to use good form during a training set can result in injury or a failure to meet training goals; since the desired muscle group is not challenged sufficiently, the threshold of overload is never reached and the muscle does not gain in strength. At a particularly advanced level; however, “cheating” can be used to break through strength plateaus and encourage neurological and muscular adaptation (Reference: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weight_training#Basic_principles)